1/20 Daughters of Iris with members of the Second Baptist Church

2/20 Bernice Wiggins - El Paso, Texas

3/20 Blanche Bonner and Soldier - El Paso, Texas circa 1915

4/20 Family Chandler

5/20 Barbershop

6/20 McCall Day Center board

7/20 McCall Neighborhood Center, El Paso, TX, circa 1985

8/20 Aldrige couple in cart

9/20 Eugene Ford Receiving Retirement - El Paso, Texas

10/20 Class of Douglass School in 1912

11/20 Douglass School Float during Sun Bowl Parade

12/20 Association of Negro Musicians Conference, El Paso, TX 1925

13/20 M.B. Aldridge

14/20 Leona Ford Washington

15/20 Class of Douglass School in 1910s

16/20 Teachers in Front of Douglass School - El Paso, Texas

17/20 B.H. and Amelia Aldridge stroll downtown in 1941

18/20 Members of the Order of the Eastern Star

19/20 Teachers and Students in front of Douglass School in the 1940s

20/20 Douglass School in Sun Carnival Parade

description

The Daughters of Iris, Oro Temple No. 9 is shown together with members of the Second Baptist Church on Virginia Street. The Daughters of Iris began nationally in 1901 and espoused principles of patriotism, loyalty, and faithfulness. They served their community through acts of charity. Location was El Paso, Texas.

Central / South Central, (1920 - 1929), Faith

  • Second Baptist Church
  • African Americans

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description

Bernice Love Wiggins was a poet during the Harlem Renaissance. Because of the death of her mother when she was five years old, she came to El Paso in 1903 to live with her aunt. Bernice attended Douglass High School and was encouraged by her teachers to pursue her writing. She died in 1936. Her self-published book "Tuneful Tales", was first published in 1925. The second printing in 2002 was very well recognized.

Central / Chamizal, (1920 - 1929), Meet El Pasoans

  • poets
  • African Americans
  • women

March is Women's History Month. I salute the historic efforts of this writer.

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description

Blanche Bonner and a soldier are posing for the camera. During World War I, about 370,000 African Americans entered the service in 1917, when the United States joined the conflict. More than half of the blacks fought with the French in the worst battles of the war. 107 soldiers received one of the highest French awards, the Croix de Guerre, from the French government.

Central / South Central, (1910 - 1919), Military

  • World War I
  • African Americans
  • women

March is Women's History Month.

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description

The photograph from the 1940s shows Rose, George, and the baby Gerolyn Chandler. George served in World War II and returned to El Paso after the war. He taught English and choir at Douglass School. Douglass School was the only school blacks could attend in El Paso until the mid-1950s.

Central / Chamizal, (1940 - 1949), Family and Friends

  • Douglass School
  • World War II
  • African Americans

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description

This was one of the early African American barbershops in El Paso that catered to African Americans. Men used this establishment to socialize and keep abreast of community happenings.

Central / South Central, (1930 - 1939), Recreation

  • African Americans

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description

The image shows the McCall Day Center board in the 1940s. Amongst others, Sadie Collins and Anita Bush are in the first row. In the third row are: Dr. Collins, William Davis, Reverend Crenshaw, Immanuel Campbell, Reverend Dale, and the principal of Douglass School, Honesbury.

The McCall Neighborhood Center was the home of Marshall McCall and Olalee McCall. Marshall McCall was the first black mail carrier in El Paso. His wife was an English teacher at Douglass School, the only school for blacks in El Paso until 1956. In 1937, she became the first female high-school principal in the El Paso Independent School District. The McCalls built their home at 3231 East Wyoming Avenue out of stone and rock. The sturdy structure and property was purchased in 1985 by the city, and it became the McCall Neighborhood Center. The building has been expanded and is home to a historical marker for Henry O. Flipper and Dr. Lawrence Nixon. It also has a historical Buffalo Soldiers exhibit, a Douglass School room, a library full of African-American history books and a variety of displays chronicling the history of the African-American community in El Paso. The historic building is the community center of the African American community.

Central / Five Points, (1940 - 1949), Service

  • African American
  • McCall
  • women

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description

The McCall Neighborhood Center was the home of Marshall McCall and Olalee McCall. Marshall McCall was the first black mail carrier in El Paso. His wife was an English teacher at Douglass School, the only school for blacks in El Paso until 1956. In 1937, she became the first female high-school principal in the El Paso Independent School District. The McCalls built their home at 3231 East Wyoming Avenue out of stone and rock. The sturdy structure and property was purchased in 1985 by the city, and it became the McCall Neighborhood Center. The building has been expanded and is home to a historical marker for Henry O. Flipper and Dr. Lawrence Nixon. It also has a historical Buffalo Soldiers exhibit, a Douglass School room, a library full of African-American history books and a variety of displays chronicling the history of the African-American community in El Paso. The historic building is the community center of the African American community.

Central / Five Points, (1940 - 1949), Cultural Heritage

  • African Americans
  • McCall

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description

Ernie and Mary Aldridge used this horse-drawn cart to take a ride around town in the 1940s. While automobiles sped through the streets of El Paso at that time, the horse-and-buggy hailed back to previous decades when the pace was slower.

Central / South Central, (1940 - 1949), Family and Friends

  • African Americans
  • Meet El Pasoans

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description

The scene shows Leona Washington's father, Eugene Ford (in suit and tie), receiving his retirement award from the Southern Pacific Railroad for his long service as a blacksmith. The Southern Pacific station was located on Franklin Street, between Stanton and Kansas Streets, before the Union Station was built in 1904. Many African Americans arrived because of the railroad, which came to El Paso in 1881. They found jobs as porters, cooks, and maintenance workers.

Leona Ford Washington (1928-2007) was teacher, community activist, newspaper publisher, and founder of the McCall Neighborhood Center in El Paso. She grew up in El Segundo Barrio and attended Douglass School, the only school blacks could attend until 1956. Leona received her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree from Prairie View A&M College (now Prairie View A&M University) and after, taught first in Las Cruces and then in El Paso. She married James Washington and had a son (who died in infancy) and a daughter, but the marriage was dissolved. Mrs. Washington taught for thirty-nine years in the El Paso Independent School District, initially at the segregated Douglass School and subsequently retiring from Alta Vista Elementary School in 1989. She was fluent in Spanish and particularly knowledgeable about the histories of the Mexican-American and Native-American communities of El Paso. Throughout the years, many El Pasoans sought her advice in improving the city and race relations. She was very active in El Paso's black community and supported the Second Baptist Church. Washington was engaged with the Martin Luther King Committee, the annual Miss Black El Paso Southwest Scholarship Pageant, the Phillis Wheatley Chapter of El Paso, the NAACP, the El Paso Community Foundation Advisory Board, the Arts and Resources Board of El Paso, and the Planned Parenthood Board of El Paso. She is especially well known for the founding of the non-profit McCall Neighborhood Center, established in 1983 and named in honor of the famed Douglass High School Teacher Olalee McCall and her husband, Marshall McCall, who served as the city’s first African-American mail carrier for the United States Postal Service. Washington also wrote and edited "The Good Neighbor Interpreter" newspaper (formerly known as the "Southwest Torch"), which focused on the history of the black community. For her engagement, Leona Washington gained numerous awards. During the 1980s Washington composed a song on El Paso, “The City of El Paso,” which Mayor Jonathan Rogers adopted as the city’s official song,
Many El Pasoans not only credit her for building up the black community in El Paso but also for establishing good relationships with other groups—Anglos, Mexican and Mexican Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans.

Central / Downtown, (1990 - 1999), Livelihood

  • African Americans
  • railroad

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description

The image shows students of the class of 1912 and their teachers in front of Douglass School in El Paso, Texas, in their Sunday best. At that time, African Americans were building a strong community despite city turmoil (the Mexican Revolution brought several fractions of Mexican revolutionaries to El Paso). However, African Americans established several churches and the Douglass student body increased.

Douglass School was organized by black families in 1883. It added a high school program in the 1890s. In 1920, the School moved to its current location on Eucalyptus Street. The school became both a place to learn and a social center for black families until El Paso public schools were desegregated in 1956. The School was named after Frederick Douglass (1817-1895), who escaped slavery and devoted his life to the abolition movement and black rights in the United States.

Central / South Central, (1910 - 1919), Education

  • African Americans
  • Douglass School

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description

The image shows the "Pennsylvania" school float of Douglass School during a Sun Bowl Parade. It was probably taken between 1925 and 1940.

Douglass School was organized by black families in 1883. It added a high school program in the 1890s. In 1920, the School moved to its current location on Eucalyptus Street. The school became both a place to learn and a social center for black families until El Paso public schools were desegregated in 1956. The School was named after Frederick Douglass (1817-1895), who escaped slavery and devoted his life to the abolition movement and black rights in the United States.

Central / El Paso High, (1920 - 1929), Celebration

  • African Americans
  • Douglass School
  • sun bowl

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description

The First Annual Conference of the West Texas Division of the Texas Association of Negro Musicians met in the fall of 1925 and grouped themselves along the side of Douglass School. Included in the picture are Alice McGowan, Blanche Bonner, and Millie Bates, along with Professor Coleman.

Douglass School was organized by black families in 1883. It added a high school program in the 1890s. in 1920, the School moved to its current location on Eucalyptus Street. The school became both a place to learn and a social center for black families until El Paso public schools were desegregated in 1956. The School was named after Frederick Douglass (1817-1895), who escaped slavery and devoted his life to the abolition movement and black rights in the United States.

Central / Chamizal, (1920 - 1929), Music

  • African Americans
  • Douglass School
  • Musicians

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description

The image shows M.B. Aldridge in suit, hat and fur in the 1930s.

Central / South Central, (1930 - 1939), Meet El Pasoans

  • African Americans
  • women

March is Women's History Month. Leona Washington was an El Pasoan who preserved much El Paso History. I salute her legacy.

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description

Leona Ford Washington (1928-2007) was teacher, community activist, newspaper publisher, and founder of the McCall Neighborhood Center in El Paso. She grew up in El Segundo Barrio and attended Douglass School, the only school blacks could attend until 1956. Leona received her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree from Prairie View A&M College (now Prairie View A&M University) and after, taught first in Las Cruces and then in El Paso. She married James Washington and had a son (who died in infancy) and a daughter, but the marriage was dissolved. Mrs. Washington taught for thirty-nine years in the El Paso Independent School District, initially at the segregated Douglass School and subsequently retiring from Alta Vista Elementary School in 1989. She was fluent in Spanish and particularly knowledgeable about the histories of the Mexican-American and Native-American communities of El Paso. Throughout the years, many El Pasoans sought her advice in improving the city and race relations. She was very active in El Paso's black community and supported the Second Baptist Church. Washington was engaged with the Martin Luther King Committee, the annual Miss Black El Paso Southwest Scholarship Pageant, the Phillis Wheatley Chapter of El Paso, the NAACP, the El Paso Community Foundation Advisory Board, the Arts and Resources Board of El Paso, and the Planned Parenthood Board of El Paso. She is especially well known for the founding of the non-profit McCall Neighborhood Center, established in 1983 and named in honor of the famed Douglass High School Teacher Olalee McCall and her husband, Marshall McCall, who served as the city’s first African-American mail carrier for the United States Postal Service. She also wrote and edited "The Good Neighbor Interpreter" newspaper (formerly known as the "Southwest Torch"), which focused on the history of the black community. For her engagement, Leona Washington gained numerous awards. During the 1980s Washington composed a song on El Paso, “The City of El Paso,” which Mayor Jonathan Rogers adopted as the city’s official song,
Many El Pasoans not only credit her for building up the back community in El Paso but also for establishing good relationships with other groups—Anglos, Mexican and Mexican Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans.

Central / South Central, (1970 - 1979), Meet El Pasoans

  • African Americans
  • Leona Washington
  • women
  • Meet El Pasoans

More info available Handbook to Texas online

March is Women's History Month. Leona set a wonderful for women leaders.

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description

Professor William Coleman (far right) posed with his class at Douglass School in the early 1900s. Georgia-born Coleman became a teacher of modern languages after graduating from Brown University in 1897, and eventually became principal of Douglass. The School had been organized by black families in 1883. It added a high school program in the 1890s. In the school year of 1899-1900, there were approximately 87 students attending Douglass; by the following year, the number had increased to 122. In 1920, the School moved to its current location on Eucalyptus Street. The school became both a place to learn and a social center for black families until El Paso public schools were desegregated in 1956.
The School was named after Frederick Douglass (1817-1895), who escaped slavery and devoted his life to the abolition movement and black rights in the United States.

Central / South Central, (1900 - 1909), Education

  • African Americans
  • Douglass School
  • Prof. Coleman
  • Segundo Barrio

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Several teachers, including Blanche Phillips, congregated in front of Douglass School in 1920. Since many African Americans sought the opportunity for education, many black women found teaching to be a wonderful chance to earn a living outside the home.

Douglass School was organized by black families in 1883. It added a high school program in the 1890s. In 1920, the School moved to its current location on Eucalyptus Street. The school became both a place to learn and a social center for black families until El Paso public schools were desegregated in 1956. The School was named after Frederick Douglass (1817-1895), who escaped slavery and devoted his life to the abolition movement and black rights in the United States.

Central / Chamizal, (1920 - 1929), Education

  • African Americans
  • Douglass School
  • women
  • education

March is Women's History Month.

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description

B.H. and Amelia Aldridge stroll downtown in this 1941 photograph.

Central / Downtown, (1940 - 1949), Recreation

  • African Americans

Photo taken in El Paso, TX.

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description

Minnie Haywood, Mrs. King Phillips, and Marie Bloodworth (from left to right) were members of the Star of the West Chapter No. 51 of the Order of the Eastern Star. This was a women's organization affiliated with the male Masons. Each chapter hosted two male members, a patron and his assistant. Female membership for this group was contingent on their relationship with a Mason.

Central / South Central, (1940 - 1949), Identity

  • African Americans
  • Minnie Haywood
  • Marie Bloodwort
  • Order of Eastern Star
  • women

Haywood is correct spelling

tag women

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description

The image shows Principal Olalee McCall, George Chandler, and Estine Davis posing with their students in front of Douglass School. The School had been organized by black families in 1883. It added a high school program in the 1890s. In 1920, the School moved to its current location on Eucalyptus Street. The school became both a place to learn and a social center for black families until El Paso public schools were desegregated in 1956. The School was named after Frederick Douglass (1817-1895), who escaped slavery and devoted his life to the abolition movement and black rights in the United States. In the 1940s, the number of students had increased to 383.

Olalee McCall was an English teacher at Douglass School, before she became the first female high-school principal in the El Paso Independent School District in 1937. The house of the McCall family was purchased by the city in 1985 and became the McCall Neighborhood Center. It now is the community center of the African American community in El Paso.

George Chandler served in World War II and returned to El Paso after. He then taught English and choir at Douglass School.

Central / Chamizal, (1940 - 1949), Education

  • African Americans
  • Douglass School
  • McCall
  • Douglass High School

The El Paso ISD desegregated on Sept. 6, 1955. On that day Douglass School had 207 fewer students (343) than the year before. On that day I met an African-American in my seventh grade class at Houston School for the first time. You might want to correct the date in the figure legend above. See El Paso Times for Sept. 7 1955 for more information.

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description

The band and baton twirlers from Douglass School are seen in the Sun Carnival Parade. This parade is an annual event in El Paso and attracts many participants and sightseers. The parade's members of the court, including queens, kings, princesses, and duchesses, are later presented at the Liberty Hall Stage. The image probably dates from the 1940s.

Since 1936, New Years in El Paso has been rung in by the Sun Carnival Parade and Sun Bowl football game. While the main focus is on the parade and the Sun Bowl football game, the Sun Carnival encompasses a host of civic and sporting events that includes pageants and balls, and tennis and basketball tournaments.

Central / El Paso High, (1940 - 1949), Celebration

  • African Americans
  • Douglass School
  • Sun Bowl
  • Sun Carnival Parade

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