1/6 Bob Beamon

2/6 Charter members of American Legion Club

3/6 Members of the American Legion Club

4/6 McCall Nursery in 1940s - El Paso, Texas

5/6 C.S. "Dusty" Rhodes addressing the NAACP in El Paso in 1990

6/6 Ruth Sumpter with Soldiers

description

Bob Beamon (born in 1946) is a former track and field athete. He is best known for his world record in the long jump at the Mexico Olympics in 1968. The length measured was 8.90 m (29 ft. 2 1/2 in.). Beamon broke the old record by nearly two feet. He hold the record for more than 22 years.
Beamon came to the University of Texas at El Paso in 1965, with a track and field scholarship. He was UTEP’s first NCAA individual champion, winning the long jump and triple jump at the 1968 indoor championships in Detroit. Two months later, the sophomore and several teammates were dismissed from the UTEP team for refusing to compete against Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. They alleged that it had racist policies.
After setting the world record, Beamon competed irregularly and retired before the 1972 Olympics. Later he was a track coach, did youth work, and participated in various sports-related activities, including fund-raising for the U.S. Olympic Committee in 1984.
In 1983 he was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame. Beamon is also a member of the UTEP Track & Field Hall of Fame.


Central / University, (1960 - 1969), Sports

  • African Americans
  • UTEP
  • track and field

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description

Charter members of the Col. Louis A. Carter Post No. 58A of the American Legion Club pose in their meeting room. The American Legion in Texas is a nonpolitical organization started after World War I, which aided veterans through legislation to secure access to hospitals, rehabilitation programs, and finding employment. It now is a large non-profit organization with more than 2 million members and with extended programs and activities.

Col. Louis A. Carter Post No. 58A (since 1953: Col. Louis A. Carter Post 832) was chartered in the 1940s. During that time in the state of Texas, membership in the American Legion did not take into account race, creed, color religion or gender, but rather an individual's devotion to military service during the time of war or conflict as established by Congress. As a way to distinguish a post whose membership were predominantly black, the post was assigned an 800 number. At the time when Post 832 was formed and chartered, most of the black people in El Paso lived in the area where the post is today. There also were a lot of black-owned businesses in the area. As time has changed, Col. Louis A. Carter Post 832 has become one of the most prominent American Legion posts in Texas.
The post is named in honor of Col. Louis A. Carter who became the only chaplain to serve with all four regular Army black regiments. On April 29, 1936, he became the first regular Army black chaplain to be promoted to the rank of colonel.

Central / Chamizal, (1940 - 1949), Service

  • African Americans
  • American Legion Club

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description

Members of the Col. Louis A. Carter Post No. 58A of the American Legion Club pose in their meeting room. The American Legion in Texas is a nonpolitical organization started after World War I, which aided veterans through legislation to secure access to hospitals, rehabilitation programs, and finding employment. It now is a large non-profit organization with more than 2 million members and with extended programs and activities.

Col. Louis A. Carter Post No. 58A (since 1953: Col. Louis A. Carter Post 832) was chartered in the 1940s. During that time in the state of Texas, membership in the American Legion did not take into account race, creed, color religion or gender, but rather an individual's devotion to military service during the time of war or conflict as established by Congress. As a way to distinguish a post whose membership were predominantly black, the post was assigned an 800 number. At the time when Post 832 was formed and chartered, most of the black people in El Paso lived in the area where the post is today. There also were a lot of black-owned businesses in the area. As time has changed, Col. Louis A. Carter Post 832 has become one of the most prominent American Legion posts in Texas.
The post is named in honor of Col. Louis A. Carter who became the only chaplain to serve with all four regular Army black regiments. On April 29, 1936, he became the first regular Army black chaplain to be promoted to the rank of colonel.

Central / Chamizal, (1940 - 1949), Service

  • African Americans
  • American Legion Club

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description

Lola Brown looks over the activities of her class at the MaCall Nursery in the mid-1940s. The McCall Nursery provided an opportunity for the children to learn social skills, develop their artistic ability, and embrace education. The nursery's goal was to provide first-class care and guidance for children of working parents.

The McCall Nursery relates to the legacy of the McCall family.
Marshall McCall was the first black mail carrier in El Paso. His wife was an English teacher at Douglass School, the only school for blacks in El Paso until 1956. In 1937, she became the first female high-school principal in the El Paso Independent School District. The McCalls built their home at 3231 East Wyoming Avenue out of stone and rock. The sturdy structure and property was purchased in 1985 by the city, and it became the McCall Neighborhood Center. The building has been expanded and is home to a historical marker for Henry O. Flipper and Dr. Lawrence Nixon. It also has a historical Buffalo Soldiers exhibit, a Douglass School room, a library full of African-American history books and a variety of displays chronicling the history of the African-American community in El Paso. The historic building is the community center of the African American community.

Central / Chamizal, (1940 - 1949), Service

  • African Americans
  • McCall
  • Lola Brown
  • women

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description

Dusty Rhodes addressed the El Paso branch of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) in 1990.

Mr. C. S. "Dusty" Rhodes arrived at Fort Bliss in 1973 and retired two years later as a lieutenant colonel after 22 years in the Army and with four Bronze Stars and a Purple Heart. He served as the East Side representative on the El Paso City Council from 1993 to 1997, was a director of the El Paso Black Chamber of Commerce and the Greater El Paso Chamber of Commerce, and co-chaired the McCall Advisory Committee. He also participated in the Center Chapel I at Fort Bliss, co-chaired the Kappa-Coors Golf Tournament, and served as a member of the airport board of directors. Appointed by Governor Rick Perry in 2004, Mr. Rhodes also served on the Texas Veterans Land Board and the Texas Commission on Private Security.

The NAACP was founded nationally in 1909. Its principal objective is to ensure the political, educational, social and economic equality of minority group citizens of United States and eliminate race prejudice. The NAACP seeks to remove all barriers of racial discrimination through the democratic processes. The organization also fights as a legal advocate.
El Paso was the first branch of the NAACP in Texas, beginning in 1914, and initiated three Supreme Court cases along with Dr. Lawrence Nixon to end the white primary in Texas.

The NAACP's most noted chartering member in El Paso is Dr. Lawrence Aaron Nixon (1884-1966), black physician and voting-rights advocate. After ten lynchings of black men in Texas in 1909, Nixon decided to become a civil-rights advocate. He then moved to El Paso, where he established a successful medical practice, helped organize a Methodist congregation, voted in Democratic primary and general elections, and in 1910 helped to organize the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
In 1924 NAACP Field Secretary William Pickens visited El Paso and announced that the NAACP intended to test the constitutionality of the Terrell Law. The Terrell Law was passed in 1923 by the Texas Legislature which stated “In no event shall a Negro be eligible to participate in a Democratic primary election…in…Texas.” On July 26, 1924, with the sponsorship of the NAACP, Nixon took his poll-tax receipt to a Democratic primary polling place and was refused a ballot. Thus began a twenty-year struggle in which Nixon and his El Paso attorney, Fred C. Knollenberg, twice carried their case to the United States Supreme Court. Nixon won his cases and today they are regarded as major steps toward voting rights. However, there were legal loopholes under which the state and the Democratic party continued to deny primary votes to blacks. It was not until 1944 that Nixon and his wife were able to vote for the first time.

Central / South Central, (1990 - 1999), Politics

  • African Americans
  • Dr. Nixon
  • Politician
  • poll tax

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description

Ruth Sumpter (1907 - 1988) posed with soldiers. The image is probably from the late 1940s. African American and white soldiers are posing together - the desegregation of the U.S. army started in 1948. The occasion of the photograph is not known.

Northeast / Ft. Bliss, (1940 - 1949), Military

  • women
  • Ruth Sumpter
  • African American
  • Military

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