Loretto Academy, 1900 to 1940s

Loretto Academy, 1900 to 1940s

Loretto Academy, 1900 to 1940s

Loretto Academy, 1900 to 1940s

Loretto Academy, 1900 to 1940s

Loretto Academy, 1900 to 1940s

Loretto Academy, 1900 to 1940s

Loretto Academy, 1900 to 1940s

Loretto Academy, 1900 to 1940s

Loretto Academy Dedication in 1924

The image shows a scene during the dedication ceremony of Loretto Academy in 1924. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Área: Central / Austin Terrace

Fuente: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Loretto Chapel Dedication 1924.

Cargado por: UTEP Library Special Collections

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Photo taken in El Paso, TX.

Saint Josephs Academy - El Paso, Texas

The image shows students and teachers of Saint Joseph's Academy (El Paso, Texas) around 1900. St. Joseph's was the forerunner of today's Loretto Academy. It was established by the Loretto sisters in San Elizario in 1879 and in 1892, they started St. Joseph’s Academy for Girls in El Paso,Texas. The Sisters of Loretto staffed most of the early parochial schools in El Paso beginning with Sacred Heart in 1892, St. Mary in 1903, St. Ignatius in 1905, Guardian Angel in 1912, Holy Family in 1922, St. Joseph and St. Patrick in 1923, and Our Lady of Assumption in 1960. In 1923, Loretto Academy in the Austin Terrace neighborhood was opened and St. Joseph Academy was transferred to the new location. High School girls and boys were educated there at that time.

Área: Central / El Paso High

Fuente: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Saint Joseph Academy around 1900 woth students including Ainsa girl.

Cargado por: UTEP Library Special Collections

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This building in downtown El Paso, TX was destroyed by Interstate 10.

March is Women's History Month. The Sisters of Loretto have been a historic force in educating El Pasoans for years and years.

Field Mass 1934

The image shows Loretto students in front of El Paso High School. They are preparing for a field mass which is about to begin. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Área: Central / Austin Terrace

Fuente: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Probably Field Mass 1934 Loretto students in front of EPHS.

Cargado por: UTEP Library Special Collections

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March is Women's History Month.

That looks like El paso high school not the academy.

Walking to Field Mass, 1934

The image shows students of Loretto Academy walking to a field mass in 1934. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Área: Central / Austin Terrace

Fuente: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Parade to Field Mass 1934.

Cargado por: UTEP Library Special Collections

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Dos niñas de Loretto - 1937

Las Hermanas de Loreto comenzaron los esfuerzos educativos en El Paso y más tarde fueron apoyadas por el Obispo Schuler (1869-1944), quien se convirtió en el primer obispo de la Diócesis Católica de El Paso de 1915 a 1942. Él y la Madre Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), superiora local de las Hermanas de Loretto, fueron la fuerza impulsora de la construcción de la Academia de Loretto. La firma de arquitectos Trost & Trost fue comisionada para diseñar el edificio. En septiembre de 1923, se inauguró la escuela en la propiedad de Trowbridge, y la Academia de San José, precursora de la Academia Loretto, se trasladó de San Elizario a la nueva escuela. 143 estudiantes matriculados - enseñados por ocho profesores. Se necesitaron 14 años más para completar las tres unidades principales. La piedra angular de la capilla se colocó en 1924. La disposición de los edificios, por su diseño, está orientada a México y se extiende en un gesto de bienvenida. De hecho, en los años siguientes, la Academia Loretto creció y jóvenes mujeres de los estados circundantes y de México vinieron a El Paso para ser educadas allí. La hermana Francetta inició la construcción de nuevos edificios, como la cafetería, la escuela primaria, el Hilton-Young Hall y la piscina. El convento albergaba a casi cien hermanas que trabajaban en la Academia y en varias escuelas parroquiales de la ciudad de El Paso. Gradualmente, se añadieron muchas otras actividades educativas; incluyendo el ministerio a las pandillas, el trabajo con el Club de Chicas, el ministerio a los muy pobres, el ministerio a los sordos, una escuela de tutoría, el trabajo catequístico, el ministerio a los ancianos, la enseñanza del inglés como segundo idioma, la educación de adultos y el ministerio pastoral. El internado se cerró en 1975 y se convirtió en una escuela secundaria para niñas. En la década de 1990, Loretto continuó aceptando niñas desde el preescolar hasta el 12º grado y niños hasta el quinto grado. Recientemente, el convento se ha convertido en un centro de retiro para organizaciones comunitarias. El número de hermanas ha disminuido, pero las tradiciones y creencias de la Academia Loretto continúan hoy en día. Fuentes: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Área: Central / Austin Terrace

Fuente: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Loretto girls 1937.

Cargado por: UTEP Library Special Collections

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Graduation class, Loretto Academy, El Paso, Texas 1930

The image shows the graduation class of 1930 in front of the chapel of Loretto Academy. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Área: Central / Austin Terrace

Fuente: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Chapel Steps of Graduation Class of 1930.

Cargado por: UTEP Library Special Collections

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March is Women's History Month annually in the USA. These young women were from both the US and Mexico. Both countries suffered during the Great Depression.

Loretto Dedication in 1924

The image shows the dedication of Loretto Academy by Bishop Schuler in 1924. The Sisters of Loretto began their educational efforts in San Elizario and then in El Paso, Texas. They were supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Área: Central / Austin Terrace

Fuente: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Bishop Schuler SJ 1924 at Dedication.

Cargado por: UTEP Library Special Collections

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In 2020 this institution was approaching its centennial.

Playground Of Loretto Academy, 1937 - El Paso, Texas

The image shows some girls of Loretto Academy at Genoveva Court playground (Nazareth Hall is there today) in 1937. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Área: Central / Austin Terrace

Fuente: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: 1937 Genoveva Court playground where Nazareth Hall is now.

Cargado por: UTEP Library Special Collections

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Postcard of Loretto College and Academy, 1920s

This postcard of the Loretty Academy dates from the 1920s. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Área: Central / Austin Terrace

Fuente: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Postcard of Loretto College and Academy.

Cargado por: UTEP Library Special Collections

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