Loretto Academy - 1940 - Present

Loretto Academy - 1940 - Present

Loretto Academy - 1940 - Present

Loretto Academy - 1940 - Present

Loretto Academy - 1940 - Present

Loretto Academy - 1940 - Present

Loretto Academy - 1940 - Present

Loretto Academy - 1940 - Present

Loretto Academy - 1940 - Present

Loretto Academy Billboard with Students, 1990 - El Paso, Texas

The image shows the billboard sign of Loretto Academy; three students are standing or sitting next to it. In the background, Saint Joseph's chapel can be seen. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Area: Central / Austin Terrace

Source: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Billboard Sign on Lawn circa 1990.

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March is Women's History Month. Loretto Academy in El Paso, TX has a long history of developing women leaders.

May Procession 1958

In this image students of Loretto Academy join the May Procession of their school in 1958. In the background, the Academy itself can be seen. Loretto Academy is in the Austin Terrace neighborhood of El Paso, Texas. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Area: Central / Austin Terrace

Source: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: May Procession 1958.

Uploaded by: UTEP Library Special Collections

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Food Drive by Loretto Academy, 1998

Loretto Academy organized a Food Drive for the Salvation Army on Christmas 1998. In the image, students put all the collected cans on the steps of Loretto Academy. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Area: Central / Austin Terrace

Source: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Canned Food Drive Salvation Army Xmas 1998.

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March is Women's History Month annually in the USA. Food drives are a part of routine training in work in the community for students at this Catholic school in El Paso TX. Loretto Academy to celebrate centennial in 2023-24.

Loretto Academy - Playing in the Snow, 1950s

The image shows students of Loretto Academy playing in the snow. It dates from the 1950s. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Area: Central / Austin Terrace

Source: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Loretto Snowbunnies 1950s.

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March is Women's History Month annually in the USA. White blouse, navy sweater, gray skirt as uniforms were recognizable all around El Paso, TX.

Loretto Academy - Little Women

Students of Loretto Academy are performing the play Little Women in 1958. Theater was one of the subjects on which the school focused. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Area: Central / Austin Terrace

Source: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Loretto 1958 Play Little Women 3.

Uploaded by: UTEP Library Special Collections

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March is Women's History Month. Alcott's work had major impact on women of USA.

Loretto Academy - Class of 1953

The image shows three students of the 1953 class of Loretto Academy. It looks like they are performing a dance. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Area: Central / Austin Terrace

Source: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Class of 1953.

Uploaded by: UTEP Library Special Collections

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Prom Night at Loretto Academy, 1940s

The image shows a scene of the prom night at Loretto Academy. It dates from the 1940s. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Area: Central / Austin Terrace

Source: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Prom 1940s.

Uploaded by: UTEP Library Special Collections

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Loretto Tennis Players, 1940s

The image shows tennis players of Loretto Academy in the 1940s. Tennis was one of the sports offered by the school. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Area: Central / Austin Terrace

Source: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: Loretto Tennis Players 1940s.

Uploaded by: UTEP Library Special Collections

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Notice clothing used by students.

Photo taken in El Paso, TX.

Loretto pupils with Santa in 1940s

The image shows 2nd grade pupils with Santa Claus in front of Loretto chapel. The Sisters of Loretto began the educational efforts in El Paso and were later supported by Bishop Schuler (1869-1944), who became the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese El Paso from 1915 to 1942. He and Mother Praxedes Carty (1854-1933), local superior of the Sisters of Loretto, were the thriving force behind the construction of Loretto Academy. The architectural firm Trost & Trost was commissioned to design the building. In September 1923, the School was opened on the Trowbridge property, and St. Joseph Academy, forerunner of Loretto Academy, was transferred from San Elizario to the new school. 143 students enrolled – taught by eight teachers. It took 14 more years to complete the three main units. The cornerstone of the chapel was laid in 1924. The arrangement of the buildings, by design, face Mexico and reach out in a welcoming gesture. Indeed, in the following years, Loretto Academy grew and young women from the surrounding states and Mexico came to El Paso to be educated there. Sister Francetta initiated the construction of new buildings, like the cafeteria, elementary school, Hilton-Young Hall and the swimming pool. The convent housed nearly one hundred Sisters who staffed the Academy and various parochial schools throughout the city of El Paso. Gradually, many other educational activities were added; including ministry to the gangs, work with Girl's Club, ministry to the very poor, ministry to the deaf, a tutoring school, catechetical work, ministry to the elderly, teaching English as a second language, adult education, and pastoral ministry. The boarding school closed in 1975 and was converted into a Middle School for girls. In the 1990s, Loretto continued to accept girls from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade and boys through fifth grade. Recently, the convent has been converted to a retreat center for community organizations. The number of Sisters has declined but the traditions and beliefs of Loretto Academy continue today. Sources: http://www.loretto.org/history/all-pages/ http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2583799

Area: Central / Austin Terrace

Source: C.L. Sonnichsen Special Collections, University of Texas at El Paso Library. Collection Name: MS447 Ross, Eva. Photo ID: 1940s and WWII-Elementary WACS 1940s during WWII with Santa.

Uploaded by: UTEP Library Special Collections

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"March is Women's History Month." - Eva Ross

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