Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass High School II

Douglass School - 1921

Douglass School (1921), kindergarten through high school. The only school for the small negro population of city, in southern section, both elementary and high school work in same building, large grounds, capacity about 300.

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: Douglass School

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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"Douglass School in El Paso, TX 1921 served only African American population as a result of segregation." - Eva Ross

George Chandler - Teacher - Douglass High School - 1945

George Chandler native of El Paso, Texas. He was a teacher at Douglass High School.

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: Douglass High School

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Graduation Class -Douglass High School - El Paso, Texas- 1949

Graduation Class -Douglass High School - 1949 1st Row L – R: 1. Wilma Jean Butts, 2. Myrtis Clerkley, 3. Norma Jean Beale 4. Anita Brown, 5. Evangeline Finley, 6. Janet Lee (mother of Chief of Police, El Paso), 7. Lovie Mae Green, 8. Lillian Nadine Moore, 9. Frankie Louise Mathis, 10. Ula B. Miller 2d Row: L – R: 1. Leatrice Agent, 2. Mary Ann Fletcher, 3. Claude Wright, 4. John Mathews, 5. Freddie Jackson, 6. Joyce D. Norris, 7. Julia Bell Mathis, 8. Betty Duncan 3d Row: L – R: 1. Curtis Clerkley (twin of Myrtis 1st row), 2. Jean Hill, 3. Herbert Miller. 4. James Bason (retired policeman in El Paso). 5. Wilma Pickard

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: Douglass High School

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Photo taken in El Paso, TX. March is Women's History Month annually in USA. How many more women than men graduated from Douglass that year? Do you think education made a significant economic differnece in their lives? How could prove it by research?

Douglass High School Float - 1940

Douglass High School Float - 1940 - Sun Bowl Parade

Area: Central / El Paso High

Source: Douglass High School

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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"First Sun Carnival Parade was in 1936." - Eva Ross

Douglass High School - 1948

Photograph of Douglass High School - El Paso, Texas. The first school for blacks had only seven students and was opened in March 1883 in the home of John Smith. Andrew Morelock was both principal and teacher. The school was given the name of "Douglass School" in tribute to Frederick Douglass, a well respected statesman and orator and one of the country's strongest abolitionist. http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2626317

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: Douglass High School

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Douglass Grammar and High School

Photo: Douglass Elementary School--Segundo Barrio In September 1883, El Paso's black families organized a private school and named it after Frederick Douglass. Douglass (1817-1895) escaped slavery and devoted his life to the abolition movement and black rights in the United States. Douglass School became a public school in 1886, when the trustees of the El Paso Public Schools included black children in the educational program of the city. A four-room brick building was erected at a corner of Fourth and Kansas streets. In 1896, after 10 years as a grammar school, 12 students enrolled in the new high-school program at the school. Over the next four years, some of the original 12 students left school to work or to marry, or they moved away. On May 28, 1900, two of the girls from the original 12 students became the first black students to graduate from high school in El Paso. In 1920, the school moved to a three-story building on Eucalyptus Street. The school became both a place to learn and a social center for black families until El Paso public schools were desegregated in 1956. http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2626317

Creator: Douglass Grammar and High School

Area: Central / South Central

Collection: Neighborhood photos

Source: Douglass Elementary

Reference ID: 0536

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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A historic marker has been added at the corner circa 2018.

Douglass Grammar and High School

Douglass Grammar and High School historical marker ceremony.

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: EPMH

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Douglass High School Reunion

A graduation class of Douglass High School reunion in 1981 in El Paso, Texas.

Creator: Douglass Elementary

Area: Central / Chamizal

Collection: Neighborhood photos

Source: Douglas Elementary

Reference ID: 0534

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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PE Class at Douglass High School

Physical Education class at Douglass High School in El Paso, Texas.

Creator: Douglass Elementary

Area: Central / Chamizal

Collection: Neighborhood photos

Source: Douglas Elementary

Reference ID: 0533

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Douglass Grammar and High School

Douglass Grammar and High School historical marker ceremony.

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: EPMH

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Douglass Grammar and High School

Douglass Grammar and High School historical marker ceremony.

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: EPMH

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Douglass Grammar and High School

Douglass Grammar and High School historical marker ceremony. Douglass Grammar and High School, El Paso, TX, circa 2015

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: EPMH

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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See publication of El Paso County Historical Society, PASSWORD,Charlotte Ivy, "Forgotten Color: Black Families in Early El Paso," Vol XXXV, No. 1, El Paso TX, p. 12-13.

Mildred Parish Massey

Congresswoman Barbara Lee’s mother Mildred Parish Massey, 90, passed away peacefully in Oakland, surrounded by family, on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015. Born June 6, 1924 in El Paso, Texas, Mrs. Massey is predeceased by her father William Calhoun Parish, her mother Willie Edith Parish, and her sister Juanita Franklin. Mrs. Massey attended Douglass elementary and high schools in El Paso, where she was the manager of the Douglass High School basketball team. She won a scholarship to Tillotson College in Austin, Texas and transferred to Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana to study business administration. Mrs. Massey broke many racial barriers in El Paso, Texas as the first African American to be hired in key positions. She worked at the USO and was the first Black clerical worker at Ft. Bliss, Texas in the Postal Locator. While working, she attended Texas Western College (now the University of Texas at El Paso) and was one of 12 students to integrate Texas Western. In 1960, Mrs. Massey moved to San Fernando, California where once again she broke many racial barriers in the workplace. She worked three jobs simultaneously to take care of her aging father and three daughters. In 1975, she moved to Oakland and worked for the Social Security Administration until her retirement in 1986. She helped found and manage her daughter’s business, The W.C. Parish Co., dba Lee Associates until her second retirement in 1998 when she moved to Sun City, Arizona. In 2010, she returned to Oakland where she resided at Grand Lake Gardens until her death. Mrs. Massey is survived by her 3 daughters, Congresswoman Barbara Lee, Mrs. Mildred Whitfield (Calvin), and Mrs. Beverly Hardy (Martin), her sister Mrs. Lois Murell, 7 grandchildren, 16 great-grand children and 1 great-great grandchild. http://postnewsgroup.com/blog/2015/02/20/mildred-parish-massey-90-congresswoman-barbara-lees-mother/

Area: Out of Area / Out of Area

Source: Barbara Lee and PostNewsGroup

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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We honor women like Mildred P. Massey during March, Women's History Month annually in the USA.

March is Women's History Month.

Douglass High School Reunion

In 1981 a graduating class of Douglass High School held a reunion in El Paso, Texas. In September 1883, El Paso's black families organized a private school and named it after Frederick Douglass. Douglass (1817-1895) escaped slavery and devoted his life to the abolition movement and black rights in the United States. Douglass School became a public school in 1886, when the trustees of the El Paso Public Schools included black children in the educational program of the city. A four-room brick building was erected at a corner of Fourth and Kansas streets. In 1896, after 10 years as a grammar school, 12 students enrolled in the new high-school program at the school. Over the next four years, some of the original 12 students left school to work or to marry, or they moved away. On May 28, 1900, two of the girls from the original 12 students became the first black students to graduate from high school in El Paso. http://www.elpasotimes.com/ci_18916058

Creator: Douglass Elementary

Area: Central / Chamizal

Collection: Neighborhood photos

Source: Douglass Elementary

Reference ID: 0535

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Graduation Class -Douglass High School - 1953

Graduation from Frederick Douglass High School, 101 S. Eucalyptus Street, El Paso, Texas - Graduation Class. 1st row: Genevieve Jackson, Betty Mae Dot Breazell, Lela Marie Moore, Silverlene Hamilton, Johnny Meryle ? Barbara Harr, Betty Jean Whitfield 2d row: Stovall ?, Frank Alexander, Conway Berry, William Prescott, Jimmy Williams, Odom ?

Creator: Douglass Elementary

Area: Central / Chamizal

Collection: Neighborhood photos

Source: Douglass Elementary

Reference ID: 0532

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Changed this to Frederick Douglass High School.

Frederick Douglass High School, 101 S. Eucalyptus Street Graduation Class

Class Picture from Douglass Elementary School

Class picture from Douglass Elementary School in El Paso, Texas. The first school for blacks had only seven students and was opened in March 1883 in the home of John Smith. Andrew Morelock was both principal and teacher. The school was given the name of "Douglass School" in tribute to Frederick Douglass, a well respected statesman and orator and one of the country's strongest abolitionist. After two and a half years, this small school closed down after encountering financial problems, but in the spring of 1886, the trustees of the public school of El Paso broadened their educational program to include black children. The board made plans to construct a four-room brick building at Fourth Street and Kansas. In order for the children to start school on time, an adobe shack on Second and Oregon Street was used. Although this temporary site featured only rough chairs and tables, the atmosphere did not affect the attitudes of the black children towards school. Children learned reading, writing and arithmetic. In 1889, the more permanent site had been adopted by the city's school system and officially named Douglass School. The school served as an elementary school until a secondary component was added in 1895-96. By 1909, the student population had grown to 260. In 1920, the school found yet another home, a larger building at its present location, 101 Eucalyptus Street in Central El Paso. The new school had 10 rooms and an auditorium. In 1944, the school was enlarged to include a gymnasium and a homemaking department. It also provided care for the small children of working mothers, the first and only school in the South to offer such program. http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2626317

Creator: Douglass Elementary

Area: Central / South Central

Collection: Neighborhood photos

Source: Douglass Elementary

Reference ID: 0530

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Cooking Class Douglass High School - El Paso, Texas

Photograph - Students and teacher in a cooking class at Douglass High School in El Paso, Texas. Like a tree, we all need a place to grow and branch out," said Sallie Berry Johnson recently, referring to Douglass School, the only school she and other blacks could attend in El Paso until the mid-1950s. The first school for blacks had only seven students and was opened in March 1883 in the home of John Smith. Andrew Morelock was both principal and teacher. The school was given the name of "Douglass School" in tribute to Frederick Douglass, a well respected statesman and orator and one of the country's strongest abolitionist. After two and a half years, this small school closed down after encountering financial problems, but in the spring of 1886, the trustees of the public school of El Paso broadened their educational program to include black children. The board made plans to construct a four-room brick building at Fourth Street and Kansas. In order for the children to start school on time, an adobe shack on Second and Oregon Street was used. Although this temporary site featured only rough chairs and tables, the atmosphere did not affect the attitudes of the black children towards school. Children learned reading, writing and arithmetic. http://epcc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=309255&sid=2626317

Creator: Douglass Elementary

Area: Central / South Central

Collection: Neighborhood photos

Source: Douglass Elementary

Reference ID: 0531

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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March is Women's History Month.

Women in 1950 did not wear dresses like this. pic is maybe 1900-1910?

Salvation Army Event at Douglass High School - 1950's

Salvation Army Event at Douglass High School - Geneva Minor, Cynthia Dupree, Herbert Johnson, Dorothy Miller, Rosie Smith, Cynthia Wilheight Whitfield, Herbert Tracy Mathis, Joseph Joe Joe Pickard, OJ Mathis (Herbert’s brother), Clarence or Stewart Berry, unknown, Jeannie Miller (Dot Miller’s sister), Pug?, Jean Bracey McBride? Charles Lee Berry (Clarence/Stewart’s brother), Dorothy Mae Whitfield (Cynthia Whitfield’s cousin), Artist Wright, Clementine Porter, Yvonne Porter (Clem’s sister), Albert Grey Richardson), Sherman Wheeler, Nick Mathis (Herbert/OJ’s sister), Rosa Nell Berry (Clarence, Stewart/Charles’ sister), Glorious Porter (Clem/Yvonne’s sister), Rudolph Pickard (Joe Joe’s brother), Alice June Fullmore, Barbara Nell Pickard (Joe Joe/Rudolph’s sister), Frankie Mathis, Audrey?, Marlin Thomas, Ovell Thomas (Marlin’s brother); Ovell gave Herbert his nickname Tracey{Dick Tracey}, Bonnie Lou Claybon, Winston Thomas (Marlin/Ovell’s brother, Marcellus Fullmore (Alice June’s brother); Katherine Johnson (Herbie’s sister), Deborah Brown, Roberta Whitefield (Dorothy May’s sister; Cynthia’s cousin), Betty Jean Whitefield (Dorothy May/Roberta’s sister, Cynthia’s cousin), Betty Mae Dot Brazel (Dorothy May/Roberta/Betty Jean’s aunt), Connie Lee (Pug’s brother), Captain Martinez, unknown, Mrs. Martinez, unknown. * Nick’s classmate The 101 S. Eucalyptus Street Douglass High School Bldg photograph has a date underneath; and it existed until 1954 when the national integration of schools; seems they didn't want non-blacks to attend our school, so they discontinued regular school classes, and demolished the bldg in 1962.

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: O.J. Mathis Photo Collection & Salvation Army

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Photo taken in El Paso, TX.

Mary Kyser - Douglass High School - 1949

Mary Kyser - Douglass High School - 1949 - student at Douglass High School.

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: Douglass High School

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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March is Women's History Month.

Photo taken in El Paso, TX.

Betty Mae Brazell - 1953

Betty Mae Brazell student at Douglass High School - class 5B. She was called "Dot" and was the mother of Dr. Wanda Lewis, DDS - Dallas, Texas. Dot was also a prize winning quitter. Her remaining sibling of a family of nine children, Mayme Avent live the city of El Paso, Texas.

Area: Central / Chamizal

Source: Betty Mae Brazell

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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