The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say!

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and Not so Saintly, in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and Not so Saintly, in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Thank you for your comment

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. “The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.”- Michael T. Ricker, Collector

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

Comments

Add a comment
Thank you for your comment

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Thank you for your comment

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

Comments

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Thank you for your comment

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Thank you for your comment

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and Not so Saintly, in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and Not so Saintly, in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and Not so Saintly, in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly in Folk Art

The Devil you Say! The Saintly and not so Saintly, in Folk Art is an exhibition that aims to highlight the ascribed Christian concept of duality, good versus evil, and how that concept has historically shaped folk art practices in the Americas. the Latin American works included herein, are either early works that reflect a standardized formula of European training or are shaped by the artisans' interpretation of Christianity as understood and practices in a deeply rooted Indigenous/Mestizo identity. a section of U.S. American works is also included as it reifies religion-based folk art. This exhibition also includes works from Europe as well as works on paper. Finally, to complement and further provide context, we include accompanying excerpts from the exhibition catalogue written by collector and scholar Michael T. Ricker. We invite the audience to consider the works as a nod to both sides of one coin. The works selected for this exhibition come from a variety of cultures representing centuries of creativity. The inspiration of many of the artists in our exhibition, most of them anonymous, stems from personal belief, often of a profound nature. Some creations emerged from workshops, or near workshop environments, and were intended to meet market demands for devotional objects. Some works are decorative -- others are intended to be used in didactic of publicly devotional manner. some works are intended to profit from a buyer's unreasonable fear (or lack thereof), while others are objects of intense personal devotion, representing visions wildly abstracted from convention and difficult to reattach to established historical context. A few, defying any reasonable categorization, help keep the boundaries delightfully fuzzy.

Area: Central / Downtown

Source: El Paso Museum of History; Michael T. Ricker

Uploaded by: El Paso Museum of History

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Otis A. Aultman playing cards with friends, he is to the far ...

Downtown El Paso

Image of downtown El Paso between 1910-1920. City Hall to the ...

El Paso Preachers

This group of Protestant ministers includes Dr. Poe of the ...

Chamber of Commerce Anniversary Luncheon

These are the past and present directors of the El Paso Chamber ...

Southwest University Park

Southwest University Park is a stadium in El Paso, Texas. It is ...

White House Department Store

The popularity of the White House exceeded the size of its ...

Southwest University Park

Southwest University Park is a stadium in El Paso, Texas. It is ...

East San Antonio Avenue

This sign marks the corner of East San Antonio Avenue and South ...

Architecture

A once beautiful building in downtown El Paso, TX.

Lamppost

Downtown El Paso is dotted with revival styles from the turn of ...

N. Mesa Street Downtown El Paso, Texas

Image of N. Mesa Street with sign and lamp post in downtown El ...

Kress Sign

This sign marks the location of Kress & Co. Department store at ...

Betty Moor MacGuire Hall - El Paso Texas

The Betty Moor MacGuire Hall is the entry lobby and patio room ...

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